The Science Of Fear: A Politically Incorrect Reflection On Strong Customer Authentication
The Science Of Fear: A Politically Incorrect Reflection On Strong Customer Authentication — By Simone Puorto

simonepuorto.com · 31 Jul

Between November 2017 and January 2018, Chinese smartphone manufacturer OnePlus suffered a major security breach, allowing hackers to steal credit cards data from over 40,000 customers. According to the company, "a malicious script was injected into the payment page code to sniff out credit card info". Unfortunately, I was amongst the affected customers, and it took me a few months and a lot of paperwork to finally get back the money fraudulently spent on my card. I had my first card twenty years ago and, except for the abovementioned incident, I concluded around 5,000 uneventful purchases. In my life as a credit card user, therefore, fraud only had an incidence of 0.02%. The odds of being struck by lightning are twice as much and, as I don't make a fuss about the lack of more severe regulations on electric discharge, I try not to panic about events for which the occurrence is statistically irrelevant.

50 Shades Of Chatbots: What Remains After The Sexiness Has Gone
50 Shades Of Chatbots: What Remains After The Sexiness Has Gone — By Simone Puorto

simonepuorto.com · 22 Jul

A few days ago, during a casual conversation on the state of AI in our industry, a friend told me: "You know what? Now that chatbots are no longer sexy, they are finally becoming useful". It is a rather bold statement but, at a closer look, it also happens to be quite accurate. Over the last year, in fact, concepts such as the Gartner's cycle, the tech adoption lifecycle or the dot-com crash analogy have been heavily quoted in articles and studies on chatbot technology. And, usually, when such (overused) concepts start popping up in blogs and publications, we're past the hype. Way past it.